Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th International Congress on Bacteriology and Infectious Diseases San Antonio, Texas, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Steven R Blanke

University of Illinois, USA

Keynote: Extending the Gut-Brain Axis: The Curious Case of Helicobacter pylori

Time : 9.30AM

OMICS International Bacteriology 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Steven R Blanke photo
Biography:

Awards RESEARCH & SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS 2015 Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology 2014 Faculty Excellence Award (one award given per year within the School of Molecular and Cellular Biology at the University of Illinois). 2004 Award for Excellence in Research and Scholarship at the Associate Professor Level - University of Houston (one university award per year at each academic rank). 2002 Award for Excellence in Research and Scholarship at the Assistant Professor Level - University of Houston (one university award per year at each academic rank).  1999 Young Investigator Award, 10th International Meeting Campylobacter & Helicobacter. 1997 Natural Science and Mathematics Alumni Association Award. 1996 Oakridge Junior Faculty Award for Life Sciences Research. 1981 NSF Undergraduate Research Award. TEACHING AWARDS AND RECOGNITION 2010, 2013 Cited as a Teacher ranked as outstanding by their students for Molecular and Cellular Biology/Life Sciences and College of Medicine Courses. 2008, 2009 Cited as a Teacher ranked as excellent by their students for Molecular and 2011, 2012 Cellular Biology/Life Sciences and College of Medicine Courses. 1999 Teaching Excellence Award, College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. 1998-1999 University of Houston Enron Award for Excellence in Teaching at the University level. RECENT LECTURESHIPS, MEETING CHAIRS, LEADERSHIP POSITIONS 2015 Vice-Chair, Gordon Conference on Chemical & Biological Terrorism Defense, Ventura, CA, March 2015. 2013 Chair, Bacteria-Host Interactions (2013) 2013 International Conference on Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus, and B. thuringiensis, Victoria, Canada, September 2, 2013. 2013-2014 Chair, Division B (Microbial Pathogens) of ASM. 2013 Discussion Leader/Session Chair, Organizing Committee, 2013 Gordon Conference on Chemical & Biological Terrorism Defense, Ventura, CA, March 10-15, 2013. 2012-2013 Chair Elect, Division B (Microbial Pathogens) of ASM, 2012-2013. 2011 Session Chair, Organizing Committee, 2011 International Conference on Campylobacter, Helicobacter, and Related Organisms, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, August 28 – September 1, 2011. 2011 Keynote Speaker, 23rd Annual Buffalo Conference on Microbial Pathogenesis – Witebsky Center for Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology (2011) Of Persistence, Cancer, and Asthma: The Curious Case of Helicobacter pylori, Buffalo, NY, April 29, 2011. 2011 Organizing Committee, and Discussion Leader/Session Chair, 2011 Gordon Conference on Chemical & Biological Terrorism Defense, Ventura, CA, March 20-25, 2011.

Abstract:

There is increasing recognition that localized microbe-host interactions inrnhumans can influence the physiology and function of distal tissue and organrnsystems in a manner that can have profound impact on human health andrndisease. For example, human gut microbiota communicate with the centralrnnervous system (CNS) via the neural, endocrine and/or immune systems,rnthereby influencing brain function. Cytokines from the peripheral immune systemrninteract with the central nervous system (CNS) via active transport across thernblood brain barrier as well as direct entry via the circumventricular organs. Here,rnwe evaluated the hypothesis that chronic gastric infection with the humanrnpathogenic bacterium Helicobacter pylori (Hp) is causal for elevated systemicrninflammation and neuro-inflammation. Chronic Hp infection is characterized byrnsustained inflammation of the gastric mucosa, which is highly associated withrnprogression to gastric ulcer disease or gastric cancer in approximately 10% andrn2% of infected individuals, respectively. Our studies employing a Sprague-rnDawley rat model for chronic Hp infection revealed sustained gastricrninflammation and tissue damage. What is more, Hp-infected rats demonstratedrnelevated inflammation with the bloodstream and CNS, with activated microgliarnand elevated TNF-α detected in the brain of the infected animals. The causalrnrelationship between gastric Hp infection and brain sequelae was supported byrnthe loss of elevated systemic and CNS inflammation upon clearance of Hprn infections following antibiotic administration. Because approximately half thernworld’s population is infected with Hp, these results have implications for thernimpact of microbes on cognition and behavior during human brain development.

Keynote Forum

George Mendz

The University of Notre Dame Australia, Australia

Keynote: The vaginal microbiome during pregnancy

Time : 10.00AM

OMICS International Bacteriology 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker George Mendz photo
Biography:

Professor George L. Mendz has an MSc from the University of Barcelona (Spain), and a PhD from the University of NSW. He has been Lecturer at the College of Natural Sciences, the University of Puerto Rico (San Juan); Research Associate at the School of Chemistry and the Department of Biochemistry, the University of Sydney; ARC Senior Research Fellow and Associate Professor at the School of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, the University of NSW; Associate Professor at the Department of Bacteriology, the University of Bordeaux II; and Associate Professor at the School of Medical Sciences, the University of NSW.

Abstract:

Background: In pregnancy, the mother’s anatomy, physiology and immune function are dynamically altered to accommodate the developing infant. Current understanding supports the view that the indigenous microbiota of the mother’s genital tract has a pivotal role in shaping the host environment.rnPreterm birth: In 2010, there were about 15 million of preterm births in the world, defined as delivery before 37 weeks gestation. Babies born prematurely have increased risk of short and long-term complications, mainly owing to the immaturity of multiple organ systems and neurodevelopmental disorders. There is overwhelming evidence to implicate genital infections in up to 40% of preterm birth cases.rnAccess to the intra-amniotic cavity is difficult, and evidence supports the hypothesis that a major path of invasion is the ascending of microorganisms from the vagina to the uterus. The changes induced in the vaginal microbial populations of pregnant women in health and disease are the subject of intense investigations to establish the type and rate of changes in this microflora during pregnancy, as well as to elucidate the changes in the microbiome resulting from the presence of pathogens.rnThe human microbiome: Cultivation-independent studies of the human microbiota performed using new generation sequencing and applying state-of-the-art biostatistical tools, have revealed the presence of trillions of microorganisms in various body microhabitats, which have a great diversity of microbial species organised in different population structures, and include a large number of dynamic interactions between microbes and with the host. In particular, the vaginal microbiome has a role in human development, physiology and immunity. rnThe vaginal microbiome: The results of many studies of the vaginal microbiota of pregnant and non-pregnant women indicate a relationship with the racial background of the woman. The data show the important role Lactobacillus bacteria have in the health of this organ, as well as the presence of vaginotypes characterised by bacterial profiles in which a single taxon dominates the population. However, modeling disease as the result of a decrease in the percentage of lactobacilli and concomitant overgrowth by other bacterial species has turned out to be too simplistic to explain the complexity, diversity and balance of the bacterial ecosystem of the vagina.rnCurrent studies of the vaginal microbiome of pregnant women can be grouped in three types:rn(1) cross-sectional studies provide snapshots of the structure of bacterial communities in the vagina at specific moments during pregnancy; rn(2) longitudinal studies address the temporal changes in this microbiome during pregnancy; andrn(3) reviews cover a broad range of issues from microbial pathogenic mechanisms to clinical practice. rnWork on the vaginal microbiome has made an invaluable contribution to understanding preterm birth; nonetheless, basic questions such as the structure of vaginal bacterial communities in women giving birth preterm or at term, or the presence/abundance of specific taxa in these two populations and their relations to infection have been given contradictory answers and remain to be elucidated.rn

Keynote Forum

Anna Goc

Dr. Rath Research Institute BV, USA

Keynote: New Non-synthetic Antibacterial Agents Challenging the Active and Persistent Forms of Borrelia ssp.

Time : 10.30AM

OMICS International Bacteriology 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Anna Goc photo
Biography:

Dr. Goc obtained her M.S. and Ph.D. from the Jagiellonian University, Cracow, Poland. She conducted her postdoctoral training at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, and the University of Georgia, Athens, GA. She also worked as a Research Biologist at the VA Medical Center, Augusta, GA. Currently, as a Head of Infectious Diseases Division at Dr. Rath Research Institute, Santa Clara CA, she leads a Lyme disease project. Dr. Goc has published over 30 peer-reviewed publications, two book chapters, and has presented her research at numerous national and international scientific meetings. She is also an active member on one editorial board and the recipient of several national and international awards.

Abstract:

Lyme borreliosis is a tick-borne bacterial infection caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. It has become a major public health concern for humans and animals worldwide. The primary treatment is based on the administration of antibiotics. However, relapse often occurs when such treatment is withdrawn. One of possible explanations for this clinical observation is the ability of Borrelia sp. to adapt different persistent forms. Thus, there is a continuous search for new compounds that would be effective not only against spirochetes but also these persisters. Naturally occurring agents signify a growing theme in antimicrobial defense. Often they represent a starting point for the development of novel treatment approaches and/or serve as a base for their modified alternatives as well. However, little is known about their anti-borreliaea efficacy. Thus, 50 non-synthetic agents such as plant-derived active compounds and plant extracts were tested in this study for their in vitro effectiveness against active and latent forms of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (predominant in the USA) and Borrelia garinii (predominant in Eurasia). From that screening, several new substances have been identified. These, described in this work, agents showed to have significant effects against both active and persistent forms of tested Borrelia sp. Moreover, enhanced reciprocal cooperation with major antibiotics currently prescribed for Lyme disease was observed. This study reveals their potential to combat these bacteria. The depictions here reported are part of ongoing preclinical development plan that could bring them to clinical trials in the near future as well.

  • Track 1: Bacterial Morphology and Metabolism
    Track 2: Bacterial Clinical Studies
    Track 4: Emerging Infectious Diseases
    Track 5: Bacterial Pathogenesis
    Track 10: Microbial Genomics
    Track 11: Industrial and Applied Bacteriology
Speaker

Chair

George L. Mendz

University of Notre Dame Australia Australia

Speaker

Co-Chair

Steven Blanke

University of Illinois, USA

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Zhan is associate professor in the Division of Pediatric Dentistry at University of California, San Francicisco. She completed her dental training and PhD at the West China University of Medical Sciences and her pediatric dental residency training at UCSF. She is a member of the International and American Associations for Dental Research, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, and is a diplomate of the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry. Her research focuses on microbiological and translational aspects of prevention of tooth decay in children, aiming to establish an individualized oral health care model for children, or precision pediatric dentistry.

Abstract:

Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic infectious disease in children. Mutans streptococci (MS) is one of the major families of cariogenic bacteria. MS virulence is critical in determining its ability to cause tooth decay. We hypothesize that the virulence factors of MS are genetically determined. Therefore, we conducted a study to identify potential virulence genes in MS by comparing full-genome sequences of mutans streptococci isolates from caries-free children versus children with severe early childhood caries. This study has identified several novel biosynthetic gene clusters that may play a significant role in regulating MS colonization and competition in oral biofilm and their cariogenicity. We are further studying the function of these genes and gene products. These findings can provide a scientific basis for developing genetic identification tools for caries risk-assessment and targeted caries prevention as a part of precision medicine.

Speaker
Biography:

Yan-Yeung Luk has completed his PhD at The University of Chicago, and postdoctoral studies from University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is the founder of LifeUnit LLC, a startup company focused on chemical control bacterial activities. He has published more than 30 papers in peer-reviewed journals and has been serving as a reviewer for NSF, and ACS journals. He is also a member on the scientific advisory broad of Orthobond INC.

Abstract:

Bacterial appendages, pili protein, have been explored for developing vaccines against infectious diseases, but without an eventual success. Here, we present a chemical approach of controlling the newly discovered signaling events that initiated by ligand binding to pili proteins on bacterial surfaces. We first demonstrate that a specific class of molecules that control a wide range of pathogenic activities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the characteristics of disrupting cell signaling of these activities, supporting the notion of a drug development. Second, we demonstrate the specific covalent coupling between a designed ligand molecule and the pili protein as a validation of the receptor protein identity. We will discuss the chemical structural space that validates a hydrocarbon-omic for controlling different species and different strains within a species of microbes.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. G. Dinesh Kumarhas completed his M.B.B.S from Meenakshi University, Kancheepuram folllowed by M.D in COMMUNITY MEDICINE at SRM UNIVERSITY, TAMIL NADU INDIA I am presently working as Assistant Professor in Dept. of Community Medicine, SRM UNIVERSITY, INDIA. I have a keen in interest in Epiedemiology and research.

Abstract:

Background: Among communicable diseases, leprosy remains a leading cause of peripheral neuropathy and disability in the world, inspite of the extensive efforts to reduce the disease burden.Objectives: To estimate the quality of life and the factors influencing quality of life among people affected by leprosy in leprosy settlements of Chengalpet taluk. Methods: Community based cross sectional study was conducted at leprosy settlements of Chengalpet taluk. A total of 247 leprosy affected persons participated in the study. House to house interview was conducted using a predesigned, pre tested questionnaire. Quality of life was assessed using the WHOQOL- BREF. Results: The Mean domain scores of the various domains were computed and it was , physical domain 20.55±3.9, psychological domain 16.16±2.9, social relationship domain 8.16±2.08 and environment domain was 24.34±3.9 The overall quality of life score was calculated and was found to be 69.21±9.9. Quality of life scores among males was more than that of the females in the various domains, although no statistical significance was observed. On assessing the overall quality of life it was found that age, educational status, income, occupation, marital status, disease duration and the disability had significance on the quality of life leprosy affected persons Conclusion: The socio demographic variables like young age, education, having an occupation and being married had positive influence on the overall quality of life domain. Care after cure should be an integral component in leprosy.

Speaker
Biography:

Assist Prof/ Dr. Maysaa has completed her M.Sc. and PhD from Al Nahrain University, Baghdad, Iraq and was one of academic staff members of Biotechnology department and group leader of medical biotechnology research. She worked on molecular analysis of infectious disease, some of the virulence factors of the pathogens, and appling some of bacterial cell components as antitumor active compounds. In 2012 she conducted her postdoctoral training at Nanomedicine-labortory of Immunology and Molecular Biomedical Research (N-LIMBR), at Deakin University, Australia. Recently join the SRF-IIE (US) fellowship at the same institute (N-LIMBR) as academic visitor and her major field of interest are nanomedicine based drug delivery systems for therapy and diagnosis.

Abstract:

A total of 53 sputum samples were collected from patients suffering from respiratory tract infections attending different hospitals of Baghdad and Al-Anbar (Ramadi) governorates. From these samples only fifty bacterial isolates were obtained and identified. According to the morphological and cultural characteristics results showed that 14 bacterial isolates (28%) were belong to Streptocoocus spp., 26 bacterial isolates (52%) were belong to Staphylococcus spp., four bacterial isolates (8%) were pseudomonas spp., and six isolates (12%) were identified as Klebsiella spp. Then further steps have been proceeded for identification Streptocoocus isolates species by biochemical tests, API 20 STEP system and blood hemolysis patterns. Results of full identification showed that only three isolates (21.4%) were identified as Streptococcus pneumoniae, five isolates (35.7%) were Streptococcus pyogenes, two isolates (14.3%) were Streptococcus mutans, two isolates (14.3%) were Streptococcus sangarius, one isolate (7.1%) was Streptococcus fecalis, and one isolate (7.1%) was Streptococcus agalacticae. Results of the antimicrobial susceptibility showed that these isolates gave different patterns of sensitivity to different antibiotics. For molecular diagnosis of these S. pneumoniae isolates and to study the epidemiology source of these isolates, ten different oligonucleotide primers were used and results showed that the genetic similarity was 67.92% between N8 and N6, while it was found to be 52.27% and 53.76% between N11 and N6 and N11 and N8, respectively. The source of isolation of three isolates confirms these results because the isolates N6 and N8 were isolated from Baghdad governorate while the isolate N11 was isolated from Al-Ramadi city (Al-Anbar province).

Speaker
Biography:

Mervat Kassem has completed her MSc in Pharmaceutical Science in 1995 and her PHD in 1999 from Alexandria University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Microbiology. Recently, she holds the positions of Associate Professor and coordinator for the postgraduate courses students in her department.

Abstract:

Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces glycolipidic surface-active molecules (rhamnolipids) which have potential biotechnological applications. A previously identified biosurfactants-producing environmental isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Ps. 6) was selected. Comparing the kinetics of cell growth and biosurfactants production by Ps. 6 in bioreactor with that of shake flask, the bioreactor was characterized by about 35% higher cell density than that of shake flask. However, the production of rhamnolipids was higher in shake flask culture than in bioreactor culture, where their minimum surface tension values obtained were 12 mN/m and 13.9 mN/m, respectively. The Ps.6 produced biosurfactants solution was stable to all tested temperatures and pH range 2-14. However, the surface tension of the biosurfactants solution increased with increasing salinity. Moreover, its emulsification indexes EI24 varied from 33.3% to 58%. It was also demonstrated that this biosurfactants solution form water in oil emulsion. Furthermore, the biosurfactants had greater antimicrobial activity against Bacillus spp. than S. aureus and M. flavus with undetectable activity against Gram negative bacteria. On testing the efficiency of the biosurfactants solution as preservative, it was found that <0.3 g% of the crude biosurfactants solution was not sufficient for preservation. Finally, the anti-biofilm activity of the produced biosurfactants reduced the biofilm formation of S. aureus ATCC 6538p by more than 2 log units.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr.Gadangi Indira has completed her PhD FROM Kakatiya University in Medical Microbiology On dermatophytosis. She is an Associate Professor and HOD of Department of Microbiology in Pingle Govt College for Women, Warangal, Telangana State, India.At present she is working on a major research project funded by U.G.C. She has published papers in both National and International journals and a reviewer for a reputed journal.

Abstract:

ESBL group of organisms are beta lactamase enzyme producing organisms capable of breaking the beta lactam ring in antibiotics hence are resistant to usually cephalosporins and few other antibiotics. In these E.coli is the most common bacteria that lives in gut harmlessly but causes Urinary tract infection and in severe cases blood poisoning, septicemia or bacteremia leading to serious sepsis. When not treated it leads to inflammation of body parts, blood clots, blocking oxygen supply andultimately causing death. In present study report a 51 years old Indian tourist patient was admitted in a Wake Med Health hospital at USA, with symptoms of UTI.In hospital she was diagnosed with ESBL E.coliUTI infection with>100,000 colonies /ml and blood culture showed positive result. In this case the Sepsiswas resulted as secondary infection. She even suffered with chronic anemia. The previous medical history of subject showed several risk factors for acquisition of infection. These include elder age, female gender,chronic anemia, recent hospitalization, surgical procedure (due to hysterectomy), intravenous catheterization, intensive careand prolonged usage of high potency antibiotics.All these factors are established as predictive and prognostic risk factors for acquisition of infection and also results in colonization of organism. The antibiotic sensitivity test was done by using CLSI, MIC method on Ampicillin, Cefazolin, Cefepime, Celfazidine, Celtriaxone, Ciprofloxacin,Levofloxacin,Tobramycin showed resistant, Nitroflurantoin showed semi resistant andErtapenem, gentamicin,Amikacin showed susceptibility. Hence the subject was treated with Doripenemas Intra Venous administration for 15 days with the help of a peripherally inserted central catheteri.e., PICC line.In this case study report,the excessive usage of high dose antibiotics for longer period made the organism resistant or immune. This factor was considered as the primary risk factor followed by hospitalization and gender. In conclusion the study of risk factors help in identification of high-risk cases of UTI positive infection. But still individualization is needed for identification of risk factors.The drug used for the treatment is expensive and often not available in developing countries. The drug sensitivity tests helps in establishing an empirical antibiotic policy.

Speaker
Biography:

Yan-Yeung Luk has completed his PhD at The University of Chicago, and postdoctoral studies from University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has been faculty at the Chemistry Department of Syracuse University. He is the founder of LifeUnit LLC, a startup company focused on chemical control bacterial activities. He has published more than 30 papers in peer-reviewed journals and has been serving as a reviewer for NSF, and ACS journals. He is also a member on the scientific advisory broad of Orthobond INC.

Abstract:

Bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lung of cystic fibrosis patients often converts to a phenotype, mucoid, that produce excessive amount of alginate polymers. These alginate polymers form a thick mucus that causes difficulty in patient’s breathing and contributes to both the morbidity and mortality of the patient. The cause and mechanism of this conversion of wild type to mucoid phenotype are still not clear. While there are commercial agents aim at washing and clearing the mucus, there are no drugs that control directly the mucus (alginate) production. Here, we demonstrate a specific class of synthetic molecules that can, in vitro, delay the production of alginate production, and inhibit the total amount of the alginate produced by mucoid phenotype. Our ongoing study of the mechanism of these chemical actions shows that one specific molecule can revert the mucoid phenotype back to wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa under conditions permit swarming. Structural variations of that specific chemical are NOT active for mucoid reversal and for alginate inhibition. This and other results suggest that the mode of action is likely a specific ligand-receptor binding event that triggers a cascade of chemical signaling events.

Speaker
Biography:

S.Krishnapriya has submitted her Ph.D Thesis under Anna University, Chennai, India. She obtained her B.E in Civil Engineering from Periyar Maniammai College of Technology for Women, India and M.E in Structural Engineering from Kumaraguru College of Technology, India. She has published four papers in International Journals and six papers in National Conferences. She is presently working as an Assistant Professor at SNS College of Technology, Coimbatore, India.

Abstract:

In the current research work, two bacterial strains were isolated from the alkaline soil samples of a cement factory.They were identified as Bacillus licheniformis BSKNAU and Bacillus flexus BSKNAU. Experimental investigations were carried out to study the effect of the bacteria on the compressive, split tensile and flexural strengths of concrete.Moreover, the effect of bacteria for improving the durability of concrete was investigated by determining the water absorption, resistance to acid attack and rapid chloride permeability of concrete.The cost effectiveness of bacterial treatment was improved by using wheat bran to replace the costly nutrient broth media for growing bacteria. The optimum bacterial cell concentration was found as 105 cells /ml of mixing water and was added to bacterial concrete specimens during casting. Control concrete specimens were cast with potable water and without any bacterial concentration The test results revealed that bacterial concrete specimens exhibited higher strength and improved durability performance when compared to control concrete specimens. Bacillus licheniformis BSKNAU considerably increased the strength and durability of concrete.Hence it is suitable for use in concrete. Bacillus flexus is not a good choice for use in concrete as it was less effective in increasing the strength and durability of concrete. The enhancement in strength and durability of concrete was due to the filling of pores and micro cracks with calcite precipitated by bacteria. The presence of calcite precipitates in bacterial concrete specimens was examined using a Scanning Electron Microscope.The calcite precipitates were confirmed using X ray Diffraction and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis.

Stevenson Many

Institut D’enseignement Chretien Siloe Medical Technology, Haïti

Title: Emerging infectious disease
Speaker
Biography:

Stevenson Many was born Port-au-Prince February 17, 1989, from a modest family. From his father, Marcul Many, trader and mechanic, he inherited his love for technology. His mother, Milienna Edme, seamstress, taught him, in addition to the civic and moral values, the sense of responsibility from childhood. His parents despite their limited education are able to convey his strict principles and strict discipline. Many Steevenson did his secondary studies at the Lycee Toussaint Louverture. He began his studies in the University Institut D’enseignement Chretien Siloé 2012-2017 Medical Biology Section

Abstract:

An infectious disease is a disease caused by the transmission of microorganisms including viruses, bacteria, parasites, fungus. Infection is the term for an infectious disease in general or contamination by germ. The contamination is the penetration of the germ in an organism. The infectious disease is the branch of medicine for infectious diseases. The specialist is an infectiologue. Emerging infectious diseases periodically worried epidemiologists and health authorities because of their health impacts, economic and socio current policies. The trichomonases are sexually transmitted diseases determined by a flagellate protozoan Trichomonas vaginal. Among infected women, it causes malodorous vaginal discharge and pus. The man becomes contaminated and can infect healthy carrier partners. Giardia is an intestinal disease caused by a flagellate protozoan Giardia lamblia. Infectious diseases are transmitted in different ways: by direct contact, by the digestive way, by the respiratory way by the gastrointestinal tract, by animal bites or stings. cost for antibiotics is low still 700 million infections were found every year with the mortality rate of 0.1% normally and in severe conditions it is about 25%.global Clinical Bacteriology market is valued at $6,727.29 million in 2014 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 13.03% between 2014 and 2019. Increasing disease burden of infectious diseases and increased funding for healthcare expenditure are the important growth drivers for this market during the forecast period. Infectious diseases are responsible worldwide for 17 million deaths per year, or one third of the deaths and 43% of deaths in developing countries (against 1% in industrialized countries). Prevention of infectious diseases is divided into three parts: avoid infection, use a condom to reduce the risk of transmission of sexually transmitted diseases. Strengthen the immune system and take preventative treatments (The simple hygiene measures are the best preventive treatment : hand washing to prevent the transmission of food infectious.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Joshi is director of surgical site infections and bacterial pathogenesis. He is an assistant professor in the Departments of Microbiology & Immunology and Surgery, and an adjunct professor at the A.J. Drexel Plasma Institute, as well as Drexel's School of Biomedical Engineering. He has a special interest in emerging bacterial infections, disinfection and sterilization, and biodefense. Since 1987, Dr. Joshi has taught undergraduate, postgraduate and doctoral students and trained doctoral and postdoctoral fellows in research. He has been mentoring graduates and medical students, who now have successful careers in medicine, academia and the pharmaceutical industry. Since 2004, he has been a member of international mentoring program and minority mentoring program of American Society of Microbiology (ASM), and Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA).

Abstract:

Biological aerosols (Bioaerosols) are environmental aerosols that contain microorganisms in them. These bioaerosols can be very effective in transmitting diseases caused by those pathogens. Most systems control microbes through particulate filters, wherein the pathogens are merely trapped which subsequently survive for long periods of time over filters. These microbes can even proliferate, and cause infections at distant places after dissemination. Hence there is a need of a technology which can effectively inactivate microbes in a very short exposure time, so their further transmission can be controlled. Currently, many technologies are been investigated for this purpose, which include carbon nanotubes, UV radiation, electrostatic fields and more recently, the use of microwave and heat treatment. Plasma technology, especially non-thermal plasma technology has been increasing used as a tool for disinfection and sterilization. Earlier research carried out at our Drexel Plasma Institute has demonstrated the effectiveness of Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma system. The proof-of-concept study presented here demonstrates the effective inactivation (> 5 logs of CFU) of a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens in the form of bioaerosls, in seconds inside the laboratory-scale model of an HVAC system, using a single filament, point to point DBD. This is an attractive and effective alternative approach to control bioaerosol and thus transmission of infectious agent. (* Presenting Author).